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  • Thursday, December 02, 2010 1:05 AM | Deleted user

    n Tuesday, November 9, the PNBAA hosted a luncheon meeting entitled CHALLENGES IN EMERGENCY RESPONSE: TAKING CARE OF YOUR PEOPLE AND ADDRESSING THE MEDIA at Seattle’s Museum of Flight. The event featured Pete Agur, President and Founder of The VanAllen Group, Inc. and Cary Pfeffer, former News Reporter, Anchor, and Founder of ClearComm Consulting. Pete shared real-world scenarios about:

    • The accident victims’ view
    • Management of the passenger manifest
    • Next of kin notification
    • High impact “to dos”

    ary provided an overview ofthe skills and expertise needed to respond effectively to and work with the media including:

    • Who should speak to the media and what they should say
    • Managing the media and their expectations
    • Short and long-term planning


     you have inquiries or further questions for the presenters, they can be reached at:

    Peter v. Agur, Jr.
    The VanAllen Group, Inc.
    770 507 5001
    pagur@vanallen.com

    Cary Pfeffer
    ClearComm Consulting
    602 318 7253
    Cary@clear-comm.net

    The 75 attendees included flight department personnel, corporate risk management and safety officers. We are always seeking ideas to ensure our events remain current and valuable. If you have feedback or thoughts on future topics and / or presenters, please email us at info@pnbaa.org.


  • Saturday, October 09, 2010 2:11 PM | Deleted user

    Boeing Field (BFI) ILS 13R Procedure
    Notice Number: NOTC2596

    The Boeing Field (BFI) ILS 13R Approach is changing!  Scheduled for publication on November 18, 2010 the new procedure changes the initial Missed Approach Altitude (climb to altitude) from 2000 feet MSL to at or below 1500 feet MSL.  The Public Comment period is closed and the graphic attached with this notice will likely be the approach plate that is published for this procedure.  Review new charts for possible changes.

    ATC wants you to be informed about the proposed new changes and they urge pilots to closely examine all approach plates prior to commencing the approach, regardless of how many times you have flown the ILS 13R approach at BFI in the past.

    While on the BFI ILS 13R approach and after intercepting the glide slope, it is possible that a pilot could execute a missed approach and instead of climbing, they would have to descend to the initial missed approach altitude.  If the decision to execute the missed approach occurred above 1500 feet MSL, you would have to continue to DESCEND during the missed approach procedure to cross OCEZE/I-BFI 3.90 DME at or below 1500 feet MSL.  After you crossed OCEZE you would then continue your climb to 6,400 feet MSL and hold at BLAKO.  This is the published Missed Approach Procedure, you may receive a different missed approach clearance from ATC.

    This crossing restriction is due to the close proximity of SeaTac International Airport (SEA) and the ability to maintain traffic separation with Boeing Field traffic.

    For further information contact:

    Holly A. Delay
    Air Traffic Manager, Boeing ATCT
    Columbia District, Western Area Terminal Operations
    holly.delay@faa.gov
    206-658-6401

    Boeing Field (BFI) 13R ILS Graphic:
    https://www.faasafety.gov/files/notices/2010/Oct/BFI_ILS_13R_PROCEDURE_GRAPHIC_ILS.pdf


  • Thursday, September 09, 2010 2:15 PM | Deleted user

    A recent joint meeting of the Pacific Northwest Business Aviation Association (PNBAA) and the Pacific Rim Schedulers & Dispatchers Association (PRSDA) at the Museum of Flight in Seattle underscored the synergies that are possible when local business aviation groups collaborate.

    Kristi Ivey, NBAA’s Northwest regional representative, said that the leaders of the two local groups – Jim Bennett, chair of the PNBAA board, and Kim Ruth, an officer of PRSDA – demonstrated how working together can advance the interests of the entire business aviation community, as well as the associations themselves.

    “The joint meeting is expected to lead to other collaborative efforts in the Pacific Northwest, which, in turn, will make possible cross-pollination of ideas among the professionals in the local business aviation community, as well as the industry as a whole.”

    PNBAA and PRSDA officials organized a riveting dinner program in which former AMI Jet Charter Chairman and CEO Chuck McLeran and other former members of the AMI/TAG Aviation leadership team for the first time publicly revealed the details of the FAA investigation and subsequent October 2007 certificate revocation that eventually led to the demise of the charter company.

    McLeran’s story, along with firsthand accounts provided by other participants in the panel discussion, was a cautionary tale for not only the capacity crowd of nearly 200 people who assembled to hear them speak, but to all those involved in FAR Part 135 operations nationwide.

    Don Hitch, president of Flight Partners Group and the PNBAA board member who coordinated the November meeting, said the program was put together due to the “numerous inquiries from the industry and colleagues” who wanted to hear what really happened during the operational control enforcement action. Hitch, a former AMI executive himself, asked the other principals involved in the landmark FAA case to shed some light on their experience, saying it was important to understand the details so as “to create an environment where this could not happen again.” Hitch also hoped that reviewing the details of the AMI case would create “an opportunity to enhance the relationship between the regulators and the industry.”

    AMI Jet Charter’s compelling story sparked in-depth conversations among the flight department managers, pilots, schedulers, dispatchers and other aviation professionals who attended the Seattle meeting, and their diverse perspectives enriched the discussion that followed the AMI presentation. Clearly, “Lessons Learned” was a fitting title for the event, and the joint meeting is expected to lead to other collaborative efforts in the Pacific Northwest, which, in turn, will make possible cross-pollination of ideas among the professionals in the local business aviation community, as well as the industry as a whole.

    “Partnering on the ‘Lessons Learned’ program ensured that every discipline – pilots, flight attendants, technicians, dispatchers and admin staff – participated in the experience,” said Bennett and Ruth. “We have found that anytime you can engage a cross-functional group under a common theme, the true value of that experience will come from input where the stakeholder perspective may be different from yours. It’s our shared vision to continue jointly hosted programs that are relevant to both groups and provide both networking and information- sharing opportunities for both organizations.”

    To learn more about regional group activities, visit www.nbaa.org/region


  • Wednesday, August 25, 2010 11:38 PM | Deleted user

    The PNBAA is dedicated to supporting and furthering the business of aviation and recognizes our members’ time is valuable. Providing timely, informative and constructive communications and events is critical to ensuring we continually bring member benefits. The following highlights our achievements to this end over the past few years:

    PNBAA works with other groups to keep on top of news and issues. Co-hosts have included the NBAA, Aviation International News (AIN Alerts), Alliance for Aviation Across America, and Pacific Rim Schedulers and Dispatchers Association. Topics have included FAA Reauthorization; Emergency Revocation of Air Carrier Certificates; Transportation Security Administration’s Large Aircraft Security Program (LASP); Safety Management Systems (SMS) resources; and dissemination of industry-specific news items.

       
    The Annual BBQ is a free and family-oriented example of PNBAA’s appreciation. Held during Seafair week at Boeing Field and when the Blue Angels’ and other air-show performers’ practice, PNBAA provides hamburgers, hotdogs, beverages and other picnic fixings for more than 200 attendees.

    Every September PNBAA hosts its charity golf event. Helping to keep the industry healthy, this outing targets aviation-focused benefactors including Aviation High School and the Civil Air Patrol. Members and sponsors have the opportunity to have fun and participate in supporting a worthy cause. In 2009, the event raised $3,000 for the Aviation High School (http://www.aviationhs.org/).

      
    Giving membership an opportunity to learn and share best practices is facilitated through this annual, day-long event that showcases international recognized, aerospace safety experts talking about the industry’s current and future safety issues and opportunities. This event has sold-out annually.

    “Lessons Learned: The AMI / TAG Experience” (co-hosted with Pacific NW Schedulers and Dispatchers Association [PRSDA]):

       

    For the 1st time publicly the events that have forever shaped the future of the air charter / management industry were memorialized when former AMI Jet Charter CEO Chuck McLeran described the October 2007 suspension and emergency revocation of AMI’s FAA Air Carrier Certificate. He joined an expert panel including Susan Santo, former TAG Aviation Legal Counsel; David Lehman, former FAA inspector, Gary Garofalo, Aviation Regulatory and Commercial Transaction Attorney, to discuss lessons learned with an international audience of nearly 200 attendees. Other speakers included Kevin Austin, Aero Law Group; Matthew Sheble, former executive at JetDirect Aviation (current COO of Flight Partners Group), and Roger McMullin, former Chairman of TAG Aviation Holding, S.A.

    International Emergency Response Planning

    Jeff Agur of the VanAllen Group, a recognized leader in ERP services, was the MC for a panel discussion on the 2006 GOL / ExcelAire midair disaster that claimed the lives of 154 people in Brazil. Presenters included David Rimmer, ExcelAire executive and passenger on board the Embraer Legacy 600 that clipped the wing of GOL’s Boeing 737. Topics discussed included international law, public relations, insurance and lessons learned.

    “Aviation Medicine and Your Medical”

    Dr’s Larry Greenblatt, FAA AME, and Michael Jones, FAA’s Regional Flight Surgeon, discussed medical certificate issues including maintaining and regaining your medical for pilots as well as general and sports wellness for all.

    FAA Re-registration

    In May 2009 and again in July 2010, PNBAA has coordinated with NBAA, AOPA, etc to issue industry’s comments to the FAA on their proposed re-registration NPRM. Members received email blasts on the subject filled with helpful information and resources for next steps. Excerpts follow:

    “Last week, the FAA finalized its long-anticipated rule on continuous registration of aircraft. This Rule directly affects each and every PNBAA member and we urge all of our members to get familiar with this Rule right away.”

    “NBAA Urges Aircraft Owners to Verify FAA Registration Information – A new re-registration requirement that will go into effect later this year may cause problems for some aircraft owners if their address information in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Registry is out of date. Aircraft owners are required to report a new address to the FAA within 30 days of the change. The FAA estimates that almost 45,000 aircraft are known to have bad addresses. Because the FAA will mail re-registration notifications to the addresses in the FAA Registry, NBAA urges all aircraft owners to proactively verify that their address in the FAA Registry is correct. If any update needs to be made, aircraft owners can do that directly with the FAA or through qualified aviation counsel for more complex registrations (e.g., owner trusts). FAA Registry data can be checked on the FAA web site via the following link: http://www.nbaa.org/admin/registration/faa”

    Safety Management and IS-BAO Meeting & Workshop

    In June of 2010, PNBAA hosted an educational, informative and interactive session on the imminent November deadline for civil operators to have a Safety Management System in place. We separated facts from fiction and hosted a panel to help members prepare and learn more. Additional information this recent AIN Alerts:

    “Babbitt: No Operator ‘Too Small’ for SMS – FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt has a message to aircraft operators that believe they should be exempt from implementing a safety management system (SMS). “I’m confident that SMS will really make a difference [in reducing aviation accidents]. I know there are those who complain that they’re too small for SMS. Or that it’s too costly. Or that they don’t have time,” he said. “No one and no company is too small for SMS. The cost of SMS is far less than the cost of an accident. Saying that you don’t have time for SMS is the functional equivalent of saying that you don’t have time for safety.” Babbitt characterized SMS thus: “You identify the problem, you analyze it, you come up with a solution, you train to the solution and then you check how you’re doing. [It’s] a safety feedback loop.” To operators who believe SMS is just a fad, he said that not only is SMS here to stay, “It’s going to be here for the long haul because it works. Everybody has a responsibility for safety.” The FAA plans to release SMS rules to operators by year-end, and some countries will require aircraft operators to have SMS implemented by year-end.”

    WA State Aviation Tax Averted

    From February thru April of 2010, PNBAA provided a series of communications urging a membership “Call to Action”! General Aviation unified and mobilized to set aside the proposed WA State tax. PNBAA joined with NBAA, Members of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the Washington Pilots Association and others in the grassroots Washington Aviation Coalition (WAC). An NBAA Press Release included quotes from PNBAA’s President, Jim Bennett, and PNBAA Director, Chuck Kegley. Bennett: “Legislators didn’t have a clear understanding of the true economic impact of aviation in the state of Washington. FBOs wouldn’t sell enough fuel, so their margins would get thinner and thinner. Airports would be impacted by those airplanes that moved to another state. Clearly, the impact was greater than the legislators had anticipated.” Kegley: “One voice, one message was the single driving premise for our group. Jobs, jobs, jobs. Aviation contributes immensely to the local and regional tax bases already, and any additional burden of a new tax may be enough to push these operators and aircraft owners to consider cheaper options, outside the state of Washington.”

    FAA Announced Moratorium on Use of Trusts is Rescinded

    PNBAA provided timely information on this commonly-used aircraft ownership structure to members. Jim Bennett, PNBAA President, and David D. Warner, PNBAA’s General Counsel stated “earlier this month, FAA announced a retroactively effective “moratorium” on the processing of aircraft registrations for owner-trusts, where the owner-beneficiary is a non-US-citizen. A very large number of US-based operating companies, lenders and leasing companies have utilized this owner trust structure to hold title and registration for decades – statutes and rules have clearly permitted its use. Making the change retroactive could have also put existing owner-trust registrations in jeopardy. A coalition, which included the PNBAA, diligently worked to present concerns and propose alternatives to the FAA. Although the industry may continue to apply this useful registration technique, the FAA will continue to review this topic and likely will initiate an orderly review and (possibly) rule making process at some point in the future.”



  • Monday, July 26, 2010 12:24 AM | Deleted user

    May 2010 was “General Aviation Appreciation Month” in Washington State proclaimed Governor Christine Gregoire, recognizing “the critical role general aviation plays in business, agriculture, emergency medical air-service, as well as to the overall economy. General aviation contributes over 178,000 jobs and approximately $3.18 billion in total economic impact to Washington alone.” For more details: http://www.aviationacrossamerica.org/

  • Saturday, July 24, 2010 12:24 AM | Deleted user

    See attached “Trust Issue” letter from FAA’s Chief Counsel.

    From Jim Bennett, PNBAA President, and David D. Warner, PNBAA’s General Counsel: Earlier this month, FAA announced a retroactively effective “moratorium” on the processing of aircraft registrations for owner-trusts, where the owner-beneficiary is a non-US-citizen. A very large number of US-based operating companies, lenders and leasing companies have utilized this owner trust structure to hold title and registration for decades – statutes and rules have clearly permitted its use. Making the change retroactive could have also put existing owner-trust registrations in jeopardy. A coalition, which included the PNBAA, diligently worked to present concerns and propose alternatives to the FAA. Although the industry may continue to apply this useful registration technique, the FAA will continue to review this topic and likely will initiate an orderly review and (possibly) rule making process at some point in the future. We would like to thank the many members of a coalition of trade groups (including PNBAA), Oklahoma City title lawyers and other interested parties that came together so quickly and worked so hard to represent our aviation industry so effectively on this matter. In particular, we thank Andrea Brantner (GE Capital Aviation Services) for her outstanding leadership in spearheading the coalition’s efforts!


  • Thursday, July 15, 2010 12:25 AM | Deleted user

    February:

    WA State House and Senate introduce Aircraft Excise Tax

    March / April:

    “Calls to Action” succeed as General Aviation unifies and mobilizes to set aside the proposed WA State tax. PNBAA joins with NBAA, Members of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the Washington Pilots Association and others in the grassroots Washington Aviation Coalition (WAC). A recent NBAA Press Release includes quotes from PNBAA’s President, Jim Bennett, and PNBAA Director, Chuck Kegley. Bennett: “Legislators didn’t have a clear understanding of the true economic impact of aviation in the state of Washington. FBOs wouldn’t sell enough fuel, so their margins would get thinner and thinner. Airports would be impacted by those airplanes that moved to another state.  Clearly, the impact was greater than the legislators had anticipated.” Kegley: “One voice, one message was the single driving premise for our group. Jobs, jobs, jobs. Aviation contributes immensely to the local and regional tax bases already, and any additional burden of a new tax may be enough to push these operators and aircraft owners to consider cheaper options, outside the state of Washington.” Thank you to all who reached out and spoke up!

    LOOKING AHEAD…Grassroots Efforts in WA State still needed:

    While we have now seen how effective the aviation groups in Washington State can mobilize when threatened with adversity from Legislation or other arenas, the fact remains: we were only successful in defeating the aviation excise tax increase efforts in Olympia by the slimmest of margins.

    We told our story well, joined the fight with the Washington Aviation Coalition (a newly restructured group of leaders from the Aviation Groups in Washington State, which also includes national representation), and fought on behalf of our state’s aviation industry with one very strong voice, thanks to all of you. During this fight, we have truly realized the need to CONTINUE to educate the state’s legislators about the aviation industry and drill into them the value of General Aviation as an essential component of the State and Local economies.

    OUR FIGHT IS NOT OVER AND WE NEED YOUR HELP… We still have a lot of work left to do, and we will call upon you again when the time comes to raise your voices yet again. The WA State Budget Deficit is going to be at least 3 times as high as it was last Session, and the State will be looking for avenues for funding yet again. We do anticipate another aviation excise tax proposal this session. PNBAA has been actively involved in ongoing discussions with the Governor’s office, members of the WA State Senate and State House of Representatives, and other Legislative Staff members to develop a reasonable fee-based schedule. PNBAA also proposes that any fees collected for aviation should go directly to the Washington Airports / WSDOT Aviation instead of to the State’s General Fund.

    Thank you, once again, for your response to our calls to action. Stay tuned for more details and/or calls to action as this legislative fight continues. If you have any questions or concerns regarding this issue or PNBAA’s overall role in government affairs, please contact PNBAA’s Chuck Kegley at chuck@reupsystems.com.


  • Thursday, May 06, 2010 1:11 AM | Deleted user


    The PNBAA Maintenance Committee provides aviation maintenance professionals in the Pacific Northwest Region an avenue to network with one another, expand their knowledge with training, and grow together to be a more cohesive group. This group typically meets as a group once a quarter in the Pacific Northwest region. This group is typically made up of directors of maintenance, aircraft technicians, aircraft inspectors, service providers, industry related vendors and also pilots. So far, we have conducted four PNBAA Maintenance Luncheons over the last year. The group has collectively elected to meet within some of the corporate aviation hangars based at Boeing Field Airport. Everyone likes to see the inside of some of these beautiful hangars that they usually only drive by coming to work. This format also keeps this group working on a minimal budget. Some of the contributing hangars to these luncheons have been American Avionics/Ashton Aviation, Nordstrom’s Corporate Flight Department, and Clay Lacy Aviation. With sponsors coming in as well to sponsor a luncheon, we have been able to keep all PNBAA Maintenance Luncheons completely free of charge to all participants.

    Some of the sponsors that we have had so far are American Avionics at Boeing Field Airport in Seattle, Global Aviation in Hillsboro, Oregon and Aircell, based in Broomfield, Colorado. As this group has progressed, many other potential sponsors are stepping up in the future to cover the costs of future luncheons. We look forward to expanding these luncheons to larger groups, as we have had growing attendance at each event, with some reaching just shy of 100 attendees. We have had many interested parties volunteer in taking part in future events. As always, these events can only take place with the involvement and participation of our members and other related participants. We welcome any feedback for future events, as well as any ideas for subject matter for future events. Obviously, the subject matter for these luncheons should relate to the day to day duties of our aviation maintenance professionals. They are meant to be informative and helpful to the understanding of current issues evolving in our industry.


     One other major benefit of these luncheons and various PNBAA gatherings is the obvious networking potential this presents to all participants. It seems that everyone gets involved in their day to day duties in their jobs and rarely takes the opportunity to fraternize with others that share the same job within different flight departments. Our luncheons provide the opportunity for old friends to re-unite and for new people in the area to get to know some of their neighbors. Some of these people have even been able to network through these luncheons to assist them in finding new employment, when they’ve been dealt the unfortunate hand of finding themselves out of work.

    Some of the subject matter data that we have covered so far in past luncheons has been:

    Avionics Acronyms – The Latest and Greatest and What’s Coming

    Getting Your Business Aircraft Online

    Presentations for these past topics are attached in the presentations below. Please feel free to refer to these presentations for future reference, as these subjects are discussed among your flight department or company.

    Some of the future plans for the PNBAA Maintenance Committee Luncheons or other events include:

    An Update from Brad Townsend, National NBAA Maintenance Committee Chairman. Brad works as the Director of Maintenance for Sprint in Kansas City, MO. He will be making a future presentation about what’s going on with NBAA’s Maintenance Committee on a national level.

    An Update from Eli Cotti, who runs the Maintenance Committee of the Chicago NBAA Regional Group.

    We are also looking into the expansion of conducting one or more of these events in other cities in the Pacific Northwest, rather than just Seattle, as we do have participants from other cities coming to our events. We look forward to being able to branch out into different cities within the Oregon and Washington areas.

    Please feel free to contact Darwin Stout, PNBAA Maintenance Committee Chairman via the contact information below for any further information or to submit any feedback on how PNBAA can better serve you, our members.

    Darwin Stout
    PNBAA Maintenance Committee Chairman
    Cell: 206-954-8657
    E-Mail: darwin.stout@gulfstream.com

    Aircell – Getting Your Business Aircraft Online Seminar – Las Vegas

    PNBAA Seattle – Avionics Acronyms – 3-23-2010


  • Friday, March 12, 2010 1:14 AM | Deleted user

     If the 2009 Pacific Northwest Business Aviation Association’s “Safety Day” was a resounding success, participants agreed that this year’s event “blew it away.”

    “I was in awe,” said Jim Bennett, president of PNBAA. Themed “The Human Side of Aviation,” the all-day regional safety event was held March 4 in Seattle’s Museum of Flight. Some 150 aviation department managers, pilots, safety officers, risk managers, directors of maintenance, schedulers and dispatchers attended, welcoming the chance to hear directly from aviation safety experts. Breakfast, lunch and all course materials were included in the $120 admission cost.

    The “Human Side of Aviation” was the focus of the 2010 Safety Day, because statistics from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) show about 75% of aviation accidents are due to human error. “We’ve done about as much as we can to make the aircraft and aviation systems as safe as possible,” said Dave Lehman, secretary of the PNBAA Board of Directors. ”It’s the human that is the weak link in aviation safety.”

    Speakers at the Safety Day comprised “an all-star cast,” said Kristi Ivey, NBAA Northwest Regional Representative. They included Sean Roberts of National Test Pilot Schools; former NTSB investigator Greg Feith; United 232 Captain Al Haynes; aviation safety analyst John Nance and the originator of Bombardier’s annual “Safety Stand-Down” events, Bob Agostino. “Several aviation department managers told me they planned to send as many people as they can next year because of the value they see in the event,” Ivey added.

    At the Safety Day, PNBAA President Bennett and Sue Carroll also presented a check for $2,500 to students from Aviation High School, the only college preparatory aviation-themed high school in the northwest. The money came from a PNBAA-sponsored charity golf tournament held last year.

    Regional Representatives
    NBAA’s Regional Representatives work with Members across the country on a range of local issues. These individuals are highly knowledgeable about the priorities for Members in their own region, state or city.

    Regional Business Aviation Groups Directory
    NBAA promotes the development and growth of local business aviation organizations, as reflected in the Association’s work to support the approximately 50 local business aviation groups currently active across the country.

    Regional Airspace and Air Traffic Issues
    NBAA coordinates with local business aviation groups on a host of regional airspace and air traffic policies and proposals affecting Association Members’ operations.


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